Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘google-rama’ Category

DC Get-Together
I think I posted that I was going to get together with some DC-area bloggers. I almost chickened out, but I decided to be a grown-up and just walk up to a group of random women who looked like they might just be a bunch of infertility bloggers. Thank heavens I picked the right group! There were nine of us there, and we really had a terrific time. I felt a little bit awkward at first, being the token pregnant-lady there, and it’s not like I can even hide it at this point. I mean, I’m fat in the first place, but at this point, I definitely am visibly pregnant and I can’t just pass it off as too many pints of Ben and Jerry’s. Anyway, no one seemed too bothered by it. My husband had suggested I wear a nametag that said, “Hello My Name Is Myrtle” but I declined. 😉

At any rate, it was a fabulous group of women and I’m thrilled to pieces that I got over my ridiculous self long enough to take a deep breath and walk up to a group of strangers, because it was truly the most enjoyable evening I’ve had in quite some time. Even if I did have to get up to pee four times (and seriously, we could NOT have been seated further away from the bathroom!). Good thing I’d insisted on sitting on the end. What a fabulous group of women we were, though! I think we may have scared the waiter a little bit, but that’s okay. It just means he earned his gratuity, right? It was a touching and hilarious night. Lindsay was so sweet and perfect, and such a doll for organizing the group in the first place. I hope we do this again soon! (though I don’t know if I’ll be able to make the next one… it totally depends on whether I do get stuck on real bedrest… we’ll see) Maybe next time we can have pedicures and mojitos (virgin for me – oh the irony!) at my place. 🙂

Some Questions Answered

Are you going to find out the sexes? Most emphatically, no. I have no intention of finding out what flavor these babies are. I figure I should get to do at least ONE thing the old fashioned way! Plus, our lives will be upside down no matter what, I seriously doubt it’s going to matter whether they’re boys or girls, and it’s likely that we’ll have a mix regardless of how they’re distributed. My husband, I think, would really like to find out. But, well, I kind of have veto power when it comes to the dildo-cam. Plus, his logic with finding out with a singleton was that it would be easier to plan. I don’t think the logic holds with triplets. I don’t think you can really plan for triplets, you just have to pray a lot! 🙂

When are you due? Heck if I know. I don’t even know how to answer that question. I’m due November 6, technically. Except, that’s never going to happen. I will deliver no later than September 26, which is exactly 34 weeks (also erev sukkot). I hope to at LEAST make it to September 12, which is 32 weeks, which I don’t think will be a problem. My perinatologist gets almost all their triplet patients to 34 weeks, with very, very few exceptions.

When does bed rest start? Heck if I know. I was originally told that it would unequivocally start this week. However, that appears to be more flexible than I was originally led to believe. Apparently because I’m doing so well, I get to lead the decision on when bed rest begins. I believe most of why I’m doing so well is that with only a couple of exceptions, if I’m not at work, I’m at home on bed rest. The DC Get Together was one such exception. But I’ve otherwise gone straight home and curled up in a recliner or my bed and not moved until I have to (usually to pee! Gah!). I intend to remain relatively strict about this, because I do enjoy the flexibility to occasionally break my self-imposed rules. I would not be so cavalier about breaking doctor-mandated bed rest. So for the moment, I’m not on bed rest officially and won’t be until I feel it’s necessary or until the doctors get uncomfortable. And that’s all I know.

Some Sad Googling

heavy bleeding contraction-like cramps: I’m going to assume whoever wrote this query is pregnant. Even if you’re not pregnant, the best advice I can give you is to contact your doctor. It could be nothing serious. I hope it’s nothing serious. But your doctor should know what’s going on.

iui cycle failed: I’m so sorry. I’ve been there, and it’s no fun. The best thing for me after a failed cycle was knowing what would be happening next. A new IUI cycle? An IVF cycle? Same Protocol? Change in Protocol? I liked to know all of that ahead of time, before it failed, not because I wanted to be pessimistic, but because it helped me take a failed cycle and psychologically turn it into a new beginning.

cyst in ovaries while pregnant: I haven’t had this problem, and I know it’s not uncommon. But there are so many ways this could be read. It depends on how big the cysts are, how many, what kind of cysts they are, etc. The good news is that you wouldn’t know that you had cysts if your doctor didn’t know, so I don’t have to worry that you aren’t under a doctor’s care. I hope you are able to find out what your options/needs are from your doctor. If you aren’t comfortable with your doctor’s advice, please seek a second or third opinion.

triplet pregnancy blogs: This, of course, isn’t one of the sad ones. You got me. I’ve definitely got a triplet pregnancy blog.

ovaries and kidneys picture with uti: I’m not quite sure what to make of this one. Anyone got any help on this one?

my ovaries hurts is that a sign that i might be pregnacy: More likely your ovaries being sensitive is a sign that you ovulated. The surest sign that you’re pregnant is the presence of hCG in your blood and urine by about 14 days post ovulation. So wait a week or two and POAS.

ovary uncomfortable: That certainly sounds unpleasant, though I often wonder how women know that it is specifically their ovary that feels uncomfortable.

severe pain in my ovaries: Any time someone suggests “severe” pain to me, I suggest contacting your physician. Anything that far outside the range of normal should be reported to your doctor.

cramps near ovaries during early pregnancy is it normal? Yes.

menstrual cramps worse after iui: This is also normal. I didn’t have cramping after all of my IUIs, but I did after a few of them, and it’s very normal. Introducing anything into the uterine environment can cause it to contract, which will cause that cramping feeling. Now if what you meant was after a failed IUI the cramps associated with the subsequent period are worse than normal… well, that’s normal too… especially if you were on progesterone supplements. It’s really unfair.

Something that Shocked Me (in a good way)
I forgot to mention that at my perinatology appointment last week, I’d made a crack at Dr. G about being bitter that they weren’t going to let me push these babies out the old fashioned way. I gave my usual shpiel about how I figure the babies are going to be so tiny that they’ll just come right out, no problem!

His response astounded me. Instead of their usual bit about “fetal distress”, “maternal hemmorhage”, “healthy outcome” and all that rational, logical stuff, he said, “well, it’s just that to do a vaginal triplet delivery everything has to line up perfectly and the odds are really low that it will, especially since you don’t have a lot of room for them to move around in there, but I’ve done it. Both Dr. P and I have done vaginal triplet deliveries.” Really? I mean, REALLY? Here I was just giving my usual joke figuring on the usual rational, logical answer, and I’m hearing that it STILL DOES HAPPEN?

“Look,” he said, “when the time gets closer, if everything is lining up perfectly, which it probably won’t, and you still want to talk about it, we can absolutely do that, but you have to understand how low the odds are of it happening that way, and you have to understand that we reserve the right at all times to tell you that we’re not going to do it.” I totally get that. But I mean… really? It could happen? Even just that 0.0000000001% chance? Really? Sure, but don’t count on it. Especially if the previa doesn’t completely resolve itself (it’s moved significantly, but it’s still in the way a bit).

Still, something about the c-section not being completely written in stone makes me feel a zillion times better. I have the absolute dumbest reason for not wanting a c-section. I want nothing to do with an epidural. Now, if I did a vaginal delivery, I’d still have to have an epidural in place, though I wouldn’t have to have drugs running through it. But my fear of the epidural is two-fold: First, I never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever want a needle in or near my spinal column ever. Second, I don’t want to not be able to feel the lower half of my body. This terrifies me. I had a TIA when I was 23, and it was terrifying not to be able to move or feel my left side. I never want to purposely experience that again. So while I wouldn’t get out of having the needle in/near my spinal column, I COULD get out of having to be numb in my lower half. I mean, it’s NEVER going to happen. There is no possibility that I’m not having a c-section. But there’s something comforting about being able to pretend for a few weeks that I have options.

Update: Carol mentioned that she’d been wondering why a c-section seemed to be the default for triplet deliveries on TV… e.g. is it because it’s easier for the doctors or because vaginal triplet deliveries aren’t possible? The answer is that in MOST cases, vaginal deliveries aren’t safe for mother OR babies. Certainly it IS easier for the doctors (and less liability), but there’s mostly the fact that very few triplet pregnancies really are conducive to safe vaginal deliveries. I’m very certain that I will not be allowed to have a vaginal delivery, but I still find it oddly comforting that my doctors are willing to consider the conversation if by some miracle everything really did line up perfectly and the stars were perfectly aligned and the moons were in all the right houses and I sacrified the right color goat…

Advice Sought re: Childbirth Class
Here’s the thing. I feel like if I were a responsible parent-to-be, I would take a parenting/childbirth class. Except that they are largely geared toward women having singleton, vaginal deliveries, which, we all know, I am not. So there are multiples classes available, except not so much. The closest class to me that’s a multiples class is in Baltimore and it’s only offered on Saturdays, which doesn’t so much work for me. (My rabbi doesn’t seem to want to give me one of those “Get out of being Jewish for a Day” cards… drat!) Okay, so to heck with those options.

I COULD take a caesarean class. EXCEPT, honestly, those are basically about what to expect from the procedure, the anesthesia, and recovery. Oh, and you get to watch a video of a c-section. Now, I’ve seen LOTS of videos of c-sections. I have had surgery before. I am not freaked out or anxious about the c-section per se. My irrational fears of the epidural aside, I have no anxiety about this in the least. I know what is going to happen, I understand my role (“lay there and do what we say”), I know what recovery from abdominal surgery is like, and I know it will suck a lot more than recovery from having my gall bladder removed laproscopically. So what’s the point? Even the nurse at the perinatologist’s office said if I wasn’t feeling anxiety about the c-section, I probably wouldn’t get much out of any such class.

So aside from getting my infant-CPR renewed, which I’d rather do closer to the delivery anyway, what should I do? Should I just accept that you don’t have to take some ridiculous class in order to be a responsible parent-to-be?

My husband also wanted to take a “Daddy Boot Camp” type class but every area hospital that has a Dads 101/Daddy Boot Camp/whatever you want to call it class offers it only on Saturdays, which, again, doesn’t work for us. So now he’s looking for some sort of book, but from what I can tell, all the dad-centric books are awful, so I think he’ll just have to wing it, unless you all have any suggestions.

Read Full Post »

DC Get-Together
I think I posted that I was going to get together with some DC-area bloggers. I almost chickened out, but I decided to be a grown-up and just walk up to a group of random women who looked like they might just be a bunch of infertility bloggers. Thank heavens I picked the right group! There were nine of us there, and we really had a terrific time. I felt a little bit awkward at first, being the token pregnant-lady there, and it's not like I can even hide it at this point. I mean, I'm fat in the first place, but at this point, I definitely am visibly pregnant and I can't just pass it off as too many pints of Ben and Jerry's. Anyway, no one seemed too bothered by it. My husband had suggested I wear a nametag that said, "Hello My Name Is Myrtle" but I declined. 😉

At any rate, it was a fabulous group of women and I'm thrilled to pieces that I got over my ridiculous self long enough to take a deep breath and walk up to a group of strangers, because it was truly the most enjoyable evening I've had in quite some time. Even if I did have to get up to pee four times (and seriously, we could NOT have been seated further away from the bathroom!). Good thing I'd insisted on sitting on the end. What a fabulous group of women we were, though! I think we may have scared the waiter a little bit, but that's okay. It just means he earned his gratuity, right? It was a touching and hilarious night. Lindsay was so sweet and perfect, and such a doll for organizing the group in the first place. I hope we do this again soon! (though I don't know if I'll be able to make the next one… it totally depends on whether I do get stuck on real bedrest… we'll see) Maybe next time we can have pedicures and mojitos (virgin for me – oh the irony!) at my place. 🙂

Some Questions Answered

Are you going to find out the sexes? Most emphatically, no. I have no intention of finding out what flavor these babies are. I figure I should get to do at least ONE thing the old fashioned way! Plus, our lives will be upside down no matter what, I seriously doubt it's going to matter whether they're boys or girls, and it's likely that we'll have a mix regardless of how they're distributed. My husband, I think, would really like to find out. But, well, I kind of have veto power when it comes to the dildo-cam. Plus, his logic with finding out with a singleton was that it would be easier to plan. I don't think the logic holds with triplets. I don't think you can really plan for triplets, you just have to pray a lot! 🙂

When are you due? Heck if I know. I don't even know how to answer that question. I'm due November 6, technically. Except, that's never going to happen. I will deliver no later than September 26, which is exactly 34 weeks (also erev sukkot). I hope to at LEAST make it to September 12, which is 32 weeks, which I don't think will be a problem. My perinatologist gets almost all their triplet patients to 34 weeks, with very, very few exceptions.

When does bed rest start? Heck if I know. I was originally told that it would unequivocally start this week. However, that appears to be more flexible than I was originally led to believe. Apparently because I'm doing so well, I get to lead the decision on when bed rest begins. I believe most of why I'm doing so well is that with only a couple of exceptions, if I'm not at work, I'm at home on bed rest. The DC Get Together was one such exception. But I've otherwise gone straight home and curled up in a recliner or my bed and not moved until I have to (usually to pee! Gah!). I intend to remain relatively strict about this, because I do enjoy the flexibility to occasionally break my self-imposed rules. I would not be so cavalier about breaking doctor-mandated bed rest. So for the moment, I'm not on bed rest officially and won't be until I feel it's necessary or until the doctors get uncomfortable. And that's all I know.

Some Sad Googling

heavy bleeding contraction-like cramps: I'm going to assume whoever wrote this query is pregnant. Even if you're not pregnant, the best advice I can give you is to contact your doctor. It could be nothing serious. I hope it's nothing serious. But your doctor should know what's going on.

iui cycle failed: I'm so sorry. I've been there, and it's no fun. The best thing for me after a failed cycle was knowing what would be happening next. A new IUI cycle? An IVF cycle? Same Protocol? Change in Protocol? I liked to know all of that ahead of time, before it failed, not because I wanted to be pessimistic, but because it helped me take a failed cycle and psychologically turn it into a new beginning.

cyst in ovaries while pregnant: I haven't had this problem, and I know it's not uncommon. But there are so many ways this could be read. It depends on how big the cysts are, how many, what kind of cysts they are, etc. The good news is that you wouldn't know that you had cysts if your doctor didn't know, so I don't have to worry that you aren't under a doctor's care. I hope you are able to find out what your options/needs are from your doctor. If you aren't comfortable with your doctor's advice, please seek a second or third opinion.

triplet pregnancy blogs: This, of course, isn't one of the sad ones. You got me. I've definitely got a triplet pregnancy blog.

ovaries and kidneys picture with uti: I'm not quite sure what to make of this one. Anyone got any help on this one?

my ovaries hurts is that a sign that i might be pregnacy: More likely your ovaries being sensitive is a sign that you ovulated. The surest sign that you're pregnant is the presence of hCG in your blood and urine by about 14 days post ovulation. So wait a week or two and POAS.

ovary uncomfortable: That certainly sounds unpleasant, though I often wonder how women know that it is specifically their ovary that feels uncomfortable.

severe pain in my ovaries: Any time someone suggests "severe" pain to me, I suggest contacting your physician. Anything that far outside the range of normal should be reported to your doctor.

cramps near ovaries during early pregnancy is it normal? Yes.

menstrual cramps worse after iui: This is also normal. I didn't have cramping after all of my IUIs, but I did after a few of them, and it's very normal. Introducing anything into the uterine environment can cause it to contract, which will cause that cramping feeling. Now if what you meant was after a failed IUI the cramps associated with the subsequent period are worse than normal… well, that's normal too… especially if you were on progesterone supplements. It's really unfair.

Something that Shocked Me (in a good way)
I forgot to mention that at my perinatology appointment last week, I'd made a crack at Dr. G about being bitter that they weren't going to let me push these babies out the old fashioned way. I gave my usual shpiel about how I figure the babies are going to be so tiny that they'll just come right out, no problem!

His response astounded me. Instead of their usual bit about "fetal distress", "maternal hemmorhage", "healthy outcome" and all that rational, logical stuff, he said, "well, it's just that to do a vaginal triplet delivery everything has to line up perfectly and the odds are really low that it will, especially since you don't have a lot of room for them to move around in there, but I've done it. Both Dr. P and I have done vaginal triplet deliveries." Really? I mean, REALLY? Here I was just giving my usual joke figuring on the usual rational, logical answer, and I'm hearing that it STILL DOES HAPPEN?

"Look," he said, "when the time gets closer, if everything is lining up perfectly, which it probably won't, and you still want to talk about it, we can absolutely do that, but you have to understand how low the odds are of it happening that way, and you have to understand that we reserve the right at all times to tell you that we're not going to do it." I totally get that. But I mean… really? It could happen? Even just that 0.0000000001% chance? Really? Sure, but don't count on it. Especially if the previa doesn't completely resolve itself (it's moved significantly, but it's still in the way a bit).

Still, something about the c-section not being completely written in stone makes me feel a zillion times better. I have the absolute dumbest reason for not wanting a c-section. I want nothing to do with an epidural. Now, if I did a vaginal delivery, I'd still have to have an epidural in place, though I wouldn't have to have drugs running through it. But my fear of the epidural is two-fold: First, I never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever want a needle in or near my spinal column ever. Second, I don't want to not be able to feel the lower half of my body. This terrifies me. I had a TIA when I was 23, and it was terrifying not to be able to move or feel my left side. I never want to purposely experience that again. So while I wouldn't get out of having the needle in/near my spinal column, I COULD get out of having to be numb in my lower half. I mean, it's NEVER going to happen. There is no possibility that I'm not having a c-section. But there's something comforting about being able to pretend for a few weeks that I have options.

Update: Carol mentioned that she'd been wondering why a c-section seemed to be the default for triplet deliveries on TV… e.g. is it because it's easier for the doctors or because vaginal triplet deliveries aren't possible? The answer is that in MOST cases, vaginal deliveries aren't safe for mother OR babies. Certainly it IS easier for the doctors (and less liability), but there's mostly the fact that very few triplet pregnancies really are conducive to safe vaginal deliveries. I'm very certain that I will not be allowed to have a vaginal delivery, but I still find it oddly comforting that my doctors are willing to consider the conversation if by some miracle everything really did line up perfectly and the stars were perfectly aligned and the moons were in all the right houses and I sacrified the right color goat…

Advice Sought re: Childbirth Class
Here's the thing. I feel like if I were a responsible parent-to-be, I would take a parenting/childbirth class. Except that they are largely geared toward women having singleton, vaginal deliveries, which, we all know, I am not. So there are multiples classes available, except not so much. The closest class to me that's a multiples class is in Baltimore and it's only offered on Saturdays, which doesn't so much work for me. (My rabbi doesn't seem to want to give me one of those "Get out of being Jewish for a Day" cards… drat!) Okay, so to heck with those options.

I COULD take a caesarean class. EXCEPT, honestly, those are basically about what to expect from the procedure, the anesthesia, and recovery. Oh, and you get to watch a video of a c-section. Now, I've seen LOTS of videos of c-sections. I have had surgery before. I am not freaked out or anxious about the c-section per se. My irrational fears of the epidural aside, I have no anxiety about this in the least. I know what is going to happen, I understand my role ("lay there and do what we say"), I know what recovery from abdominal surgery is like, and I know it will suck a lot more than recovery from having my gall bladder removed laproscopically. So what's the point? Even the nurse at the perinatologist's office said if I wasn't feeling anxiety about the c-section, I probably wouldn't get much out of any such class.

So aside from getting my infant-CPR renewed, which I'd rather do closer to the delivery anyway, what should I do? Should I just accept that you don't have to take some ridiculous class in order to be a responsible parent-to-be?

My husband also wanted to take a "Daddy Boot Camp" type class but every area hospital that has a Dads 101/Daddy Boot Camp/whatever you want to call it class offers it only on Saturdays, which, again, doesn't work for us. So now he's looking for some sort of book, but from what I can tell, all the dad-centric books are awful, so I think he'll just have to wing it, unless you all have any suggestions.

Read Full Post »

DC Get-Together
I think I posted that I was going to get together with some DC-area bloggers. I almost chickened out, but I decided to be a grown-up and just walk up to a group of random women who looked like they might just be a bunch of infertility bloggers. Thank heavens I picked the right group! There were nine of us there, and we really had a terrific time. I felt a little bit awkward at first, being the token pregnant-lady there, and it's not like I can even hide it at this point. I mean, I'm fat in the first place, but at this point, I definitely am visibly pregnant and I can't just pass it off as too many pints of Ben and Jerry's. Anyway, no one seemed too bothered by it. My husband had suggested I wear a nametag that said, "Hello My Name Is Myrtle" but I declined. 😉

At any rate, it was a fabulous group of women and I'm thrilled to pieces that I got over my ridiculous self long enough to take a deep breath and walk up to a group of strangers, because it was truly the most enjoyable evening I've had in quite some time. Even if I did have to get up to pee four times (and seriously, we could NOT have been seated further away from the bathroom!). Good thing I'd insisted on sitting on the end. What a fabulous group of women we were, though! I think we may have scared the waiter a little bit, but that's okay. It just means he earned his gratuity, right? It was a touching and hilarious night. Lindsay was so sweet and perfect, and such a doll for organizing the group in the first place. I hope we do this again soon! (though I don't know if I'll be able to make the next one… it totally depends on whether I do get stuck on real bedrest… we'll see) Maybe next time we can have pedicures and mojitos (virgin for me – oh the irony!) at my place. 🙂

Some Questions Answered

Are you going to find out the sexes? Most emphatically, no. I have no intention of finding out what flavor these babies are. I figure I should get to do at least ONE thing the old fashioned way! Plus, our lives will be upside down no matter what, I seriously doubt it's going to matter whether they're boys or girls, and it's likely that we'll have a mix regardless of how they're distributed. My husband, I think, would really like to find out. But, well, I kind of have veto power when it comes to the dildo-cam. Plus, his logic with finding out with a singleton was that it would be easier to plan. I don't think the logic holds with triplets. I don't think you can really plan for triplets, you just have to pray a lot! 🙂

When are you due? Heck if I know. I don't even know how to answer that question. I'm due November 6, technically. Except, that's never going to happen. I will deliver no later than September 26, which is exactly 34 weeks (also erev sukkot). I hope to at LEAST make it to September 12, which is 32 weeks, which I don't think will be a problem. My perinatologist gets almost all their triplet patients to 34 weeks, with very, very few exceptions.

When does bed rest start? Heck if I know. I was originally told that it would unequivocally start this week. However, that appears to be more flexible than I was originally led to believe. Apparently because I'm doing so well, I get to lead the decision on when bed rest begins. I believe most of why I'm doing so well is that with only a couple of exceptions, if I'm not at work, I'm at home on bed rest. The DC Get Together was one such exception. But I've otherwise gone straight home and curled up in a recliner or my bed and not moved until I have to (usually to pee! Gah!). I intend to remain relatively strict about this, because I do enjoy the flexibility to occasionally break my self-imposed rules. I would not be so cavalier about breaking doctor-mandated bed rest. So for the moment, I'm not on bed rest officially and won't be until I feel it's necessary or until the doctors get uncomfortable. And that's all I know.

Some Sad Googling

heavy bleeding contraction-like cramps: I'm going to assume whoever wrote this query is pregnant. Even if you're not pregnant, the best advice I can give you is to contact your doctor. It could be nothing serious. I hope it's nothing serious. But your doctor should know what's going on.

iui cycle failed: I'm so sorry. I've been there, and it's no fun. The best thing for me after a failed cycle was knowing what would be happening next. A new IUI cycle? An IVF cycle? Same Protocol? Change in Protocol? I liked to know all of that ahead of time, before it failed, not because I wanted to be pessimistic, but because it helped me take a failed cycle and psychologically turn it into a new beginning.

cyst in ovaries while pregnant: I haven't had this problem, and I know it's not uncommon. But there are so many ways this could be read. It depends on how big the cysts are, how many, what kind of cysts they are, etc. The good news is that you wouldn't know that you had cysts if your doctor didn't know, so I don't have to worry that you aren't under a doctor's care. I hope you are able to find out what your options/needs are from your doctor. If you aren't comfortable with your doctor's advice, please seek a second or third opinion.

triplet pregnancy blogs: This, of course, isn't one of the sad ones. You got me. I've definitely got a triplet pregnancy blog.

ovaries and kidneys picture with uti: I'm not quite sure what to make of this one. Anyone got any help on this one?

my ovaries hurts is that a sign that i might be pregnacy: More likely your ovaries being sensitive is a sign that you ovulated. The surest sign that you're pregnant is the presence of hCG in your blood and urine by about 14 days post ovulation. So wait a week or two and POAS.

ovary uncomfortable: That certainly sounds unpleasant, though I often wonder how women know that it is specifically their ovary that feels uncomfortable.

severe pain in my ovaries: Any time someone suggests "severe" pain to me, I suggest contacting your physician. Anything that far outside the range of normal should be reported to your doctor.

cramps near ovaries during early pregnancy is it normal? Yes.

menstrual cramps worse after iui: This is also normal. I didn't have cramping after all of my IUIs, but I did after a few of them, and it's very normal. Introducing anything into the uterine environment can cause it to contract, which will cause that cramping feeling. Now if what you meant was after a failed IUI the cramps associated with the subsequent period are worse than normal… well, that's normal too… especially if you were on progesterone supplements. It's really unfair.

Something that Shocked Me (in a good way)
I forgot to mention that at my perinatology appointment last week, I'd made a crack at Dr. G about being bitter that they weren't going to let me push these babies out the old fashioned way. I gave my usual shpiel about how I figure the babies are going to be so tiny that they'll just come right out, no problem!

His response astounded me. Instead of their usual bit about "fetal distress", "maternal hemmorhage", "healthy outcome" and all that rational, logical stuff, he said, "well, it's just that to do a vaginal triplet delivery everything has to line up perfectly and the odds are really low that it will, especially since you don't have a lot of room for them to move around in there, but I've done it. Both Dr. P and I have done vaginal triplet deliveries." Really? I mean, REALLY? Here I was just giving my usual joke figuring on the usual rational, logical answer, and I'm hearing that it STILL DOES HAPPEN?

"Look," he said, "when the time gets closer, if everything is lining up perfectly, which it probably won't, and you still want to talk about it, we can absolutely do that, but you have to understand how low the odds are of it happening that way, and you have to understand that we reserve the right at all times to tell you that we're not going to do it." I totally get that. But I mean… really? It could happen? Even just that 0.0000000001% chance? Really? Sure, but don't count on it. Especially if the previa doesn't completely resolve itself (it's moved significantly, but it's still in the way a bit).

Still, something about the c-section not being completely written in stone makes me feel a zillion times better. I have the absolute dumbest reason for not wanting a c-section. I want nothing to do with an epidural. Now, if I did a vaginal delivery, I'd still have to have an epidural in place, though I wouldn't have to have drugs running through it. But my fear of the epidural is two-fold: First, I never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever want a needle in or near my spinal column ever. Second, I don't want to not be able to feel the lower half of my body. This terrifies me. I had a TIA when I was 23, and it was terrifying not to be able to move or feel my left side. I never want to purposely experience that again. So while I wouldn't get out of having the needle in/near my spinal column, I COULD get out of having to be numb in my lower half. I mean, it's NEVER going to happen. There is no possibility that I'm not having a c-section. But there's something comforting about being able to pretend for a few weeks that I have options.

Update: Carol mentioned that she'd been wondering why a c-section seemed to be the default for triplet deliveries on TV… e.g. is it because it's easier for the doctors or because vaginal triplet deliveries aren't possible? The answer is that in MOST cases, vaginal deliveries aren't safe for mother OR babies. Certainly it IS easier for the doctors (and less liability), but there's mostly the fact that very few triplet pregnancies really are conducive to safe vaginal deliveries. I'm very certain that I will not be allowed to have a vaginal delivery, but I still find it oddly comforting that my doctors are willing to consider the conversation if by some miracle everything really did line up perfectly and the stars were perfectly aligned and the moons were in all the right houses and I sacrified the right color goat…

Advice Sought re: Childbirth Class
Here's the thing. I feel like if I were a responsible parent-to-be, I would take a parenting/childbirth class. Except that they are largely geared toward women having singleton, vaginal deliveries, which, we all know, I am not. So there are multiples classes available, except not so much. The closest class to me that's a multiples class is in Baltimore and it's only offered on Saturdays, which doesn't so much work for me. (My rabbi doesn't seem to want to give me one of those "Get out of being Jewish for a Day" cards… drat!) Okay, so to heck with those options.

I COULD take a caesarean class. EXCEPT, honestly, those are basically about what to expect from the procedure, the anesthesia, and recovery. Oh, and you get to watch a video of a c-section. Now, I've seen LOTS of videos of c-sections. I have had surgery before. I am not freaked out or anxious about the c-section per se. My irrational fears of the epidural aside, I have no anxiety about this in the least. I know what is going to happen, I understand my role ("lay there and do what we say"), I know what recovery from abdominal surgery is like, and I know it will suck a lot more than recovery from having my gall bladder removed laproscopically. So what's the point? Even the nurse at the perinatologist's office said if I wasn't feeling anxiety about the c-section, I probably wouldn't get much out of any such class.

So aside from getting my infant-CPR renewed, which I'd rather do closer to the delivery anyway, what should I do? Should I just accept that you don't have to take some ridiculous class in order to be a responsible parent-to-be?

My husband also wanted to take a "Daddy Boot Camp" type class but every area hospital that has a Dads 101/Daddy Boot Camp/whatever you want to call it class offers it only on Saturdays, which, again, doesn't work for us. So now he's looking for some sort of book, but from what I can tell, all the dad-centric books are awful, so I think he'll just have to wing it, unless you all have any suggestions.

Read Full Post »

I’m exhausted, having been kept out way past my bedtime tonight, but I noticed a keyword search in my statcounter I didn’t want to ignore…

heart surgery for treatment of migaines: For those of you who are relatively new to my blog, you probaby have no idea why this would have popped up my blog in a google search. But whoever did this keyword search should know that yes, there ARE currently three concurrent studies going on that involve heart surgery for the treatment of migraines. It seems that a large percentage of migraine sufferers have a “patent foramen ovale” which is a condition in which a small valve which normally closes at or near birth didn’t close, so you’ve essentially got a small hole in your heart. This is generally not considered a huge deal and most people who have one never know it, but it is beginning to be associated with early stroke and with migraines. A recent couple of studies involving closing the PFO for stroke patients showed a surprising number of patients who had the lucky side effect of total or significant resolution of migraine symptoms after having the PFO closed. Thus, some new studies have been started and are currently in progress and recruiting patients.

I almost participated in one such study but was disqualified because I get too many migraines. Truth be told, I didn’t try all that hard to qualify. There was a qualifying month in which I had to keep an electronic headache diary that I transmitted to the clinic every night. If during that month I had been extremely cautious about every single migraine trigger I have, and if I’d worked harder to sleep more and work less, I probably could have stayed under 14 migraines in that qualifying period, though it would have been challenging since I was just weeks post-miscarriage and in a very busy period at work. But I also knew that qualifying for and participating in the study would have meant taking a year off of the whole fertility treatment thing and I just wasn’t sure I was willing to make that sacrifice, even if the payoff was the possibility of a life without migraines. Even the debilitating, life-altering migraines I get on a regular basis. It wasn’t an easy decision to make, so obviously, my sub-conscious made the decision for me.

If you want to read more specifics about my experience with trying to decide what to do about the study, look at my posts from November 4-15, 2006. If you want to talk in greater detail about the studies themselves or what I know about them, please feel free to email me directly.

Edited to Add: I was just re-reading my posts about the migraine study and my decision-making process. I waffled a lot about whether to participate. It was a really hard process for me, because the bottom line was that if I’d qualified and decided to participate, that would have meant going on birth control for a year, which was a huge thing for me, shockingly enough. This post in particular, highlighted the conflict of emotion I was feeling through the process, but one line stood out above all:

And yet… I would gladly suffer migraines forever in exchange for a baby.

It’s still true, you know. As much as I complain about the migraines… as insufferable as they are… I worked so hard, cried so many tears, suffered so much (and yet, not nearly as much as many of my fellow stirrup queens)… these babies are what I wanted. They are what I want. I wouldn’t trade them for anything. Not even a life free of migraines. I’ll take the heartburn and the sciatica and the nausea and the round ligament pain and the oxygen deprivation and the sleep deprivation and the anxiety and the contractions and the baby punching my cervix and yes, even the migraines. I’ll take it all with a smile on my face when I can, because I want these babies so badly I can taste it. I love them already and I’m already terrified that I’m failing them as a parent by even thinking about the negative parts about this whole pregnancy thing.

The one thing that my children… all our children… will always know is that they were, above everything else… wanted. And THAT is what makes all this infertility bullshit worth it.

Read Full Post »

I'm exhausted, having been kept out way past my bedtime tonight, but I noticed a keyword search in my statcounter I didn't want to ignore…

heart surgery for treatment of migaines: For those of you who are relatively new to my blog, you probaby have no idea why this would have popped up my blog in a google search. But whoever did this keyword search should know that yes, there ARE currently three concurrent studies going on that involve heart surgery for the treatment of migraines. It seems that a large percentage of migraine sufferers have a "patent foramen ovale" which is a condition in which a small valve which normally closes at or near birth didn't close, so you've essentially got a small hole in your heart. This is generally not considered a huge deal and most people who have one never know it, but it is beginning to be associated with early stroke and with migraines. A recent couple of studies involving closing the PFO for stroke patients showed a surprising number of patients who had the lucky side effect of total or significant resolution of migraine symptoms after having the PFO closed. Thus, some new studies have been started and are currently in progress and recruiting patients.

I almost participated in one such study but was disqualified because I get too many migraines. Truth be told, I didn't try all that hard to qualify. There was a qualifying month in which I had to keep an electronic headache diary that I transmitted to the clinic every night. If during that month I had been extremely cautious about every single migraine trigger I have, and if I'd worked harder to sleep more and work less, I probably could have stayed under 14 migraines in that qualifying period, though it would have been challenging since I was just weeks post-miscarriage and in a very busy period at work. But I also knew that qualifying for and participating in the study would have meant taking a year off of the whole fertility treatment thing and I just wasn't sure I was willing to make that sacrifice, even if the payoff was the possibility of a life without migraines. Even the debilitating, life-altering migraines I get on a regular basis. It wasn't an easy decision to make, so obviously, my sub-conscious made the decision for me.

If you want to read more specifics about my experience with trying to decide what to do about the study, look at my posts from November 4-15, 2006. If you want to talk in greater detail about the studies themselves or what I know about them, please feel free to email me directly.

Edited to Add: I was just re-reading my posts about the migraine study and my decision-making process. I waffled a lot about whether to participate. It was a really hard process for me, because the bottom line was that if I'd qualified and decided to participate, that would have meant going on birth control for a year, which was a huge thing for me, shockingly enough. This post in particular, highlighted the conflict of emotion I was feeling through the process, but one line stood out above all:

And yet… I would gladly suffer migraines forever in exchange for a baby.

It's still true, you know. As much as I complain about the migraines… as insufferable as they are… I worked so hard, cried so many tears, suffered so much (and yet, not nearly as much as many of my fellow stirrup queens)… these babies are what I wanted. They are what I want. I wouldn't trade them for anything. Not even a life free of migraines. I'll take the heartburn and the sciatica and the nausea and the round ligament pain and the oxygen deprivation and the sleep deprivation and the anxiety and the contractions and the baby punching my cervix and yes, even the migraines. I'll take it all with a smile on my face when I can, because I want these babies so badly I can taste it. I love them already and I'm already terrified that I'm failing them as a parent by even thinking about the negative parts about this whole pregnancy thing.

The one thing that my children… all our children… will always know is that they were, above everything else… wanted. And THAT is what makes all this infertility bullshit worth it.

Read Full Post »

I'm exhausted, having been kept out way past my bedtime tonight, but I noticed a keyword search in my statcounter I didn't want to ignore…

heart surgery for treatment of migaines: For those of you who are relatively new to my blog, you probaby have no idea why this would have popped up my blog in a google search. But whoever did this keyword search should know that yes, there ARE currently three concurrent studies going on that involve heart surgery for the treatment of migraines. It seems that a large percentage of migraine sufferers have a "patent foramen ovale" which is a condition in which a small valve which normally closes at or near birth didn't close, so you've essentially got a small hole in your heart. This is generally not considered a huge deal and most people who have one never know it, but it is beginning to be associated with early stroke and with migraines. A recent couple of studies involving closing the PFO for stroke patients showed a surprising number of patients who had the lucky side effect of total or significant resolution of migraine symptoms after having the PFO closed. Thus, some new studies have been started and are currently in progress and recruiting patients.

I almost participated in one such study but was disqualified because I get too many migraines. Truth be told, I didn't try all that hard to qualify. There was a qualifying month in which I had to keep an electronic headache diary that I transmitted to the clinic every night. If during that month I had been extremely cautious about every single migraine trigger I have, and if I'd worked harder to sleep more and work less, I probably could have stayed under 14 migraines in that qualifying period, though it would have been challenging since I was just weeks post-miscarriage and in a very busy period at work. But I also knew that qualifying for and participating in the study would have meant taking a year off of the whole fertility treatment thing and I just wasn't sure I was willing to make that sacrifice, even if the payoff was the possibility of a life without migraines. Even the debilitating, life-altering migraines I get on a regular basis. It wasn't an easy decision to make, so obviously, my sub-conscious made the decision for me.

If you want to read more specifics about my experience with trying to decide what to do about the study, look at my posts from November 4-15, 2006. If you want to talk in greater detail about the studies themselves or what I know about them, please feel free to email me directly.

Edited to Add: I was just re-reading my posts about the migraine study and my decision-making process. I waffled a lot about whether to participate. It was a really hard process for me, because the bottom line was that if I'd qualified and decided to participate, that would have meant going on birth control for a year, which was a huge thing for me, shockingly enough. This post in particular, highlighted the conflict of emotion I was feeling through the process, but one line stood out above all:

And yet… I would gladly suffer migraines forever in exchange for a baby.

It's still true, you know. As much as I complain about the migraines… as insufferable as they are… I worked so hard, cried so many tears, suffered so much (and yet, not nearly as much as many of my fellow stirrup queens)… these babies are what I wanted. They are what I want. I wouldn't trade them for anything. Not even a life free of migraines. I'll take the heartburn and the sciatica and the nausea and the round ligament pain and the oxygen deprivation and the sleep deprivation and the anxiety and the contractions and the baby punching my cervix and yes, even the migraines. I'll take it all with a smile on my face when I can, because I want these babies so badly I can taste it. I love them already and I'm already terrified that I'm failing them as a parent by even thinking about the negative parts about this whole pregnancy thing.

The one thing that my children… all our children… will always know is that they were, above everything else… wanted. And THAT is what makes all this infertility bullshit worth it.

Read Full Post »

Latest Googling

I’ve gotten a lot of google hits lately. Not surprisingly, a lot of them have revolved around the sextuplets. Actually, come to think of it, that does surprise me a little, because I wouldn’t think my blog would end up high on the list of hits in a sextuplet search, but even so, I’m not surprised people have been searching for it. So I decided it’s time to play another round of recent keyword searches. Some I’ve gotten have been predictable, some have been profoundly sad, and some have been profoundly hilarious. I’ll let you decide which is which.

Perky ovaries: Well, this one is predictable and is always high on the list. I actually don’t quite understand it. I’m going to have to assume that it is people who have heard of my blog but can’t remember the URL so they’re search for me specifically, because, really, who else would be searching for the term, “perky ovaries”??? (there was also a search for “my perkie ovaries” which I’m guessing really was someone looking for me specifically)

Morrison sextuplets stupid, Morrison sextuplets, Minnesota sextuplet, sextuplets Briana latest remaining, sextuplets and Morrison, Morrison sextuplets Minnesota, sextuplets Minnesota died, Morrison sextuplets reduction god: Actually, I do find this interesting… notice that the common trend isn’t just that it’s sextuplets? It’s specifically searches for the Morrison sextuplets that are leading people to my blog. Interesting. You can see that some people have formed opinions (as did I) before they’ve even finished googling. I don’t think it’s entirely fair to characterize the Morrisons as “stupid” though admittedly, I did characterize their doctors as “reckless” before I knew the whole story. I am so very sad for the Morrisons. Jody raised a very good point in her comment to my second sextuplet post: “Curiously enough, I don’t think there are very many examples of people taking crazy risks when they conceive their HOM pregnancies, although that’s certainly the spin the issue gets in every book and scholarly article written. Time after time, you see people making careful decisions and being screwed or surprised by the outcome. It seems to me that more needs to be written about that — that the conception of HOMs often happens against the best intentions and practices of the patients and doctors alike.” We would do well to remember that we haven’t lived the lives of the Morrisons (or the Masches, for that matter) or their doctors, and we can’t know what choices were made under what circumstances with what level of input, research and consideration. I made choices in this triplet pregnancy that not everyone agrees with, but they were my choices.

Pregnant with triplets belly pics, expanding pregnant belly photos, triplets pregnancy pics, clomid miracle triplets photos, pictures of a woman pregnant with quads, triplet belly shot: Still not gonna happen. I’m not planning to post belly shots, at least not yet. However, Jody and others HAVE convinced me that I need to at least take the occasional belly shot for my own sake, so I DO have one or two sitting on my digital camera, and I’ll have my husband take another this week. Maybe at the very, very end I’ll post a picture or two. But not now. Now I just feel like a giant freak, even though I know I’m not. However, I’ve also gotten bunches of searches for things like triplet ultrasound pictures and the like, and those I do post when I find the time to scan them. I have nine billion ultrasound pictures, so I really only post them when there have been really significant changes and they’re feeling particularly photogenic that day, but I don’t have any problem showing off my exhibitionist babies.

1st trimester spotting sneeze: Er… so I’m guessing when you sneeze, you’re spotting? Are you sure it’s really spotting and not just “leaking” a bit? Well, my guess, to be honest, is that it’s a combination. Spotting in the first trimester is really common. I didn’t just spot in the first trimester for either of my pregnancies, I had all-out bleeding for most of the first trimester both times (admittedly, the first time I didn’t make it past the first trimester, but that was unrelated to the bleeding). However, spotting is normal. So is “leaking” a bit of pee when you sneeze. My guess is that you’re noticing the spotting more when you sneeze because you’re “leaking” at the same time. I hear kegels help that, but it never really worked for me.

Pulsating pain in left ovary: never having experienced this, and not wanting to dispense medical advice, I’ll simply say you should mention it to your doctor.

What does it feel like to be pregnant with triplets: Honestly? Well, I’m only in my 20th week, and so I can’t say I know the whole story (but check in with Jody at http://raisingweg.typepad.com who has triplets who just finished kindergarten!), but so far? It’s pretty darned exhausting. From what I can tell, it’s like a singleton pregnancy, but on super-speed. The exhaustion is for sure three times worse and that second-trimester energy burst doesn’t happen. Nausea varies for everyone, but for me is for sure three times worse. At 20ish weeks I’m still taking Zofran so that I can keep food down, whereas with a singleton pregnancy, one would expect that nausea would go away around 12 or 13 weeks. You have all the aches and pains of a singleton pregnancy, but sooner. I started having contractions at 15 weeks, round ligament pain at 16 or 17 weeks, hip pain even earlier than that, heartburn around 17 weeks (and it’s only getting WORSE), sciatica around 17 weeks, and all sorts of fun. On the other hand, at some point, I’ll probably be able to distinguish the three babies’ movements, which is something singleton moms never get to experience. Right now I can tell when Baby A is moving because he/she is literally punching my cervix regularly (which freaking HURTS!!), but the other two are indistinguishable from one another, though I suspect I’m mostly feeling baby B, since he/she is the more active of the two (baby C is kind of squished in the corner and seems pretty docile). I admit that talking about what it “feels” like to be pregnant with triplets isn’t particularly pleasant sounding, because it’s NOT the most pleasant feeling. Everything is uncomfortable, and it’s going to be that way for a good, long while. On the other hand, it is surreal and interesting and unique, and I feel very blessed even though 10 weeks ago, I would not have believed you if you’d told me I would soon refer to myself as “blessed” to be feeling this way.

Ivf ohss walking: Fortunately for me, I can’t help you there. Unfortunately for her, I suggest you contact Akeeyu who has the misfortune of personal experience in this arena. http://herveryown.typepad.com

Can ovary get loose come out: hehwha? Well, okay. There are two ways to read this question. No, it’s not going to fall out, if that’s what you’re asking. But the ovaries are attached to the uterus via a ligament, I believe, and I imagine that ligament could become severed through trauma or some such thing. What I don’t know is the medical ramifications of such a detachment. My guess is that the only real ramifications would be fertility-related, unless there was significant trauma involved, but I’m not a doctor and I don’t play one on TV.

What to expect from two gestational sacs one without a heartbeat: well, that depends on when you had the ultrasound. At my third ultrasound, I had three gestational sacs, and one heartbeat. But it was only barely at the point where you could theoretically visualize a heartbeat. I was told then to expect to have a singleton pregnancy, but I didn’t think that would be the case. Four days later, I had three gestational sacs and three heartbeats and it has remained three ever since. But I don’t know when you had your ultrasound. If you had that ultrasound at 8 or 9 weeks, it’s unlikely that a second heartbeat will materialize. If you had that ultrasound at 5 weeks, 5 days, anything could happen. I hope that everything turned out for the very best for you.

Pregnant topomax: You found my blog because you, like me, misspelled Topamax, which drives my pharmacist husband crazy. Anyway, this is a question you have to speak with your doctor about. I believe Topamax is Pregnancy Category D, so it’s a question of weighing the risk benefit ratio. Obviously if you have seizures, you have to keep them under control. If, like me, you have migraines, you have to consider the level of debilitation you are suffering, but this risk/benefit analysis must be considered with your doctor, not unilaterally, as this is not something you want to take into your own hands, particularly in early pregnancy. Most anticonvulsants are particularly problematic in early pregnancy, which is why I suffered through my first trimester in tears a lot of the time. I am now taking a very low dose of Topamax. It’s not a therapeutic dose, but it is helping a little bit. I cannot, however, emphasize enough that this is not something to decide without consulting your physician or physicians. Involve your OB and your neurologist, and encourage them to communicate with each other if you can.

Expecting triplets risks debate: I try not to get into this too much, to be honest. I had very specific personal medical risks to consider and those were the concerns I focused on in my own decision-making process. If you look through my “reduction discussion” tag you’ll see some of that debate. Jody’s blog also has some good facts and sources. Mostly I relied on PubMed and my husband’s ability to pull full medical journal articles from the medical library at the hospital he works at. I tried not to pull information randomly from the internet. I wanted true, quantifiable medical studies about triplets, prematurity, reduction, and my specific medical conditions.

How ovaries make triplet babies: Now, I know this was a serious question, but I literally almost snarfed when I read this one. Anyway, there are a couple of ways that triplets get made… either your ovary produces multiple eggs in an ovulatory cycle (producing fraternal, or trizygotic triplets) or (more rarely) your ovary produces one egg which spontaneously splits into three zygotes after fertilization (monozygotic, or identical, triplets). You can also have a combination (two eggs, one of which splits once), which is the most common configuration of triplets for spontaneous triplets (vs. fertility-assisted triplets which are more commonly trizygotic). Also with IVF, you can transfer multiple embryos into the uterine environment resulting in multiple gestations, though do note that monozygotic twinning is more common with IVF than with spontaneous pregnancies, interestingly enough.

Insurance okayed ivf but not iui: I gotta tell you, if they’re going to deny one but not the other, that’s the way to go. An IUI cycle at my clinic (without meds) runs about $2000 if you don’t have insurance. An IVF cycle at my clinic (without meds) if you don’t have insurance runs about $10K.

When will I deliver my triplets? Average gestation for triplets in the US is 32 or 33 weeks depending on who you ask. My perinatology practice doesn’t let most of their triplet patients go beyond 34 ½ weeks because they find the babies do better on the outside than the inside after that point (particularly with me, because I’m short). They won’t let me go past 34 weeks, which is fine by me. My practice historically does get the majority of their triplet patients to 34 weeks, with only a couple of exceptions per year (they deliver about 15 sets of triplets per year) I do know women with triplets who have gone to 35 and 36 weeks and I’ve heard of women with triplets who have gone to 37 and 38 weeks, though I can’t for the life of me figure out WHY or HOW.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »